Is Epilepsy A Special Educational Need?

Do seizures kill brain cells?

Isolated brief seizures probably do not kill neurons; however, severe and repetitive seizures (i.e., status epilepticus) certainly do.

Because status epilepticus both kills neurons and also leads to chronic epilepsy, neuronal death has been proposed to be an integral part of acquired epileptogenesis..

How does epilepsy affect you emotionally?

After a seizure, you may feel anxious or depressed for days or weeks, if the parts of the brain that affect mood are recovering from the seizure. Confusion or memory loss after a seizure can also be worrying or depressing. Before a seizure you may feel irritable, anxious, depressed or aggressive.

What are the long term effects of epilepsy?

Status epilepticus is an especially dangerous epilepsy complication because it can cause permanent brain damage. Death is also a possibility. Weight gain: Certain antiseizure medications can make weight loss and management more challenging. Being overweight can then increase your risk for other chronic health problems.

How does epilepsy affect education?

Some children with some epilepsy syndromes are more likely to have learning difficulties than others. Epileptic seizures can disrupt normal brain activity, and this can stop memory from working properly. The confusion that can happen for your child after a seizure may also cause memory loss.

Does epilepsy qualify for IEP?

If a child has epilepsy but the condition does not adversely affect his or her educational performance, the child will not be eligible for special education under the IDEA.

What is considered a special educational need?

What ‘special educational needs’ means. ‘Special educational needs’ is a legal definition and refers to children with learning problems or disabilities that make it harder for them to learn than most children the same age.

Can epilepsy go away?

While many forms of epilepsy require lifelong treatment to control the seizures, for some people the seizures eventually go away. The odds of becoming seizure-free are not as good for adults or for children with severe epilepsy syndromes, but it is possible that seizures may decrease or even stop over time.

How does a person with epilepsy behave?

Epilepsy has significant effects on the behavior of most people who have it. In some cases the seizure activity itself is manifested as a brief change or interruption in behavior that might appear unusual to the casual observer. Evidence also suggests that epilepsy can affect behavior when seizures are not occurring.

Is epilepsy a special need?

Federal law, as well as many state laws, grants children with epilepsy the right to receive those supplemental services and if necessary, special education. These federal laws are known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504).